The Yummy experiences


Baigan or Eggplant, stuffed with spicy ground Masala cooked to perfection

 This recipe is very similar to stuffed Bhindi. The masala is slightly different, that’s it! Must try these the next time you find small eggplants in the market.

Cooking time 30 mins
Ingredients
Small Eggplants 8
Masala for stuffing
Salt to taste
Red chili powder ½ tsp
Coriander powder 1 tsp
Garam Masala ½ tsp
Jeera powder (cumin) ½ tsp
Amchoor powder ½ tsp
Jeera Powder ½ tsp
Hing ¼ tsp
Turmeric powder ¼ tsp
Oil 1 tbsp

Directions
  • Wash and dry the eggplants under a fan on a towel.
  • In a small saucer/plate, mix all the dry spices and salt.
  • Slit the eggplants/Baigan in the middle, by making two cuts perpendicular to each other, lengthwise, without cutting completely through the top.
  • Using the back of the knife put the mixed spices in the cuts.
  • In a non stick pan, add oil to heat.
  • Add all the baigan in the pan. Keep the flame on medium.
  • After 5 mins, gently stir them. Do not toss else masala might come out.
  • Reduce the flame to low and cover with a lid.
  • After 10 mins, stir the eggplants slightly and change the bottom side.
  • Cook for another 10 mins without the lid, on low flame.
  • Serve hot as a side dish or as a main course with roti and curd.

Chef’s Tip: You can also slice the eggplants into circles and sprinkle this spice masala as you cook them in a pan. They make for awesome eggplant crispies.

Bharwan Bhindi
Bharwan Bhindi

Ladyfinger or Okra, stuffed with spicy ground Masala cooked to perfection

Bhindi is a favorite in Indian households and is loved by all. You can cut Bhindi into small pieces and cook with sliced onions, or make them whole with a stuffing of masalas. I’ll show you how to make bharwan (stuffed) Bhindi in this recipe. The best part is that the stuffed eggplant or the Masala baigan (eggplant) is also made in similar way, so this is actually buy one get one recipe free! It’s really simple, easy, very quick and really tasty. So you must try this sometime soon!

Cooking time 30 mins
Ingredients
Bhindi/ Okra/ Ladyfinger 500gms (take of small or medium length, approx index finger size)
Masala for stuffing
Salt to taste
Red chili powder ½ tsp
Coriander powder 1 tsp
Garam Masala ½ tsp
Jeera powder (cumin) ½ tsp
Amchoor powder ½ tsp
Saunf/aniseed powder ½ tsp
Hing ¼ tsp
Oil 1 tbsp

Directions
  • Wash and dry the ladyfingers under a fan on a towel.
  • In a small saucer/plate, mix all the dry spices and salt.
  • Slit the Bhindi / ladyfinger in the middle, without cutting completely through it.
  • Using the back of the knife, put the mixed spices in the Ladyfingers.
  • In a non stick pan, add oil to heat.
  • Add all the Bhindi in the pan with the slit side up. Keep the flame on medium.
  • After 5 mins, gently stir the ladyfingers. Do not toss else masala might come out.
  • Reduce the flame to low and cover with a lid.
  • After 10 mins, stir the Bhindi. You can toss now as the masala would’ve stuck to the inside of the Bhindi and cooked through.
  • Cook for another 10 mins without the lid, on low flame.
  • Serve hot as a side dish or as a main course with roti and curd or dal.
Chef’s Tip: You can also sprinkle some besan initially on the Bhindi while adding them to the pan. This crisps them up a little and adds a nice crunch.


Let's take this quiz about desserts to see how much we know about our favorite part of the meal! 
Each question has 4 options; just mark the answer you think is correct. Click on the question, and the introduction will subside to show all options.
I'm sure after this; you'll want to try many of these recipes. Some are available with my blog, for others surf the web a little. You can refer to Maggie Beer's site, I love her recipes. 
So let's get started. Please post your questions if you have doubts about any answers. 
I'll really appreciate if you can share the link for this post on Facebook or elsewhere and have fun with your friends teasing and challenging them, acknowledging my effort along the way! :)  
Have fun foodies!






Crispy baby corn is a deliciously simple recipe, and makes for a tasty quick appetizer. This Chinese dish will surprise your guests and you’ll wonder why have you been ordering this from restaurants when you can make it so easily yourself at home! These days baby corns are available very easily in all supermarkets, and even good grocery stores in our localities. With very few simple ingredients, this is a must try for all, esp. Chinese cuisine lovers!



Ingredients
16 Baby corn cobs
¼ cup corn flour
½ cup Maida/Flour
¼ tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
Salt to taste
¼ tbsp oil + for deep frying
2-3 spring onions chopped
2-3 tbsp Sichuan Sauce (readymade or click here for Recipe of Sichuan Sauce)
2 stalks of spring onions greens (the part above the onions like chives)

Recipe
  • Blanch the baby corns in 2 cups of water for 3 mins.
  • Mix together corn flour, maida, salt, baking soda, baking powder, and half cup of water to make moderately thick batter. (Like we make for pakoras)
  • Heat oil in a wok for deep frying. Dip baby corn in the batter and fry till light yellowish golden brown and crisp. Drain on absorbent paper.
  • Once all cobs are fried, and then fry them again till golden brown. Drain and keep aside.
  • In another pan or wok, add 1 tbsp oil. Add spring onions and Sichuan sauce and sauté on medium heat for 45 seconds.
  • Add friend baby corn and chopped spring onion greens. Cook on high flame for 1 minute, tossing continuously.
  • Serve hot with any relish/salsa/Sichuan sauce.
Chef’s Tip: You can also add diced tofu or shredded boiled chicken to make a side dish variant.

Ingredients
10-12 Dried Red Chilies
½ cup oil
10 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 green chilies finely chopped
2 spring onions finely chopped
1 inch ginger grated
2-3 inch celery stalk, finely chopped
3 tbsp tomato ketchup
Salt to taste
2 tsp white vinegar

Method
  • Remove stems, and boil the red chilies in 1 cup water for 5-8 mins. Drain, cool and make a fine paste.
  • Heat oil in a pan. Add garlic, ginger, green chilies, spring onions, and sauté for 1 min. Add red chili paste and sauté for few seconds. Add celery, tomato ketchup, salt and mix well.
  • Stir in vinegar and simmer for 1 min on low flame. When oil rises to surface, turn off heat.
  • Cool the mixture, and store in a bottle.
  • Let the oil cover the surface of the sauce. This Sichuan sauce can last in the fridge for 1 month.


Dal Tadka

Dal Tadka is my favorite for dinner. It reminds me of my childhood days, when the whole family sued to sit together for dinner and watch news as we ate, and dal was the everyday dinner. I don’t even remember asking mom what’s for dinner! Dal or lentil is available in a lot of varieties in the market, and is a very good source of protein esp for the vegetarians.  I am sure you must also have your favorite variety, everyone has! Mine is the dal tadka and the ‘maa ki daal’, the black dal with rajma and awesome yummy creamy tempering. That recipe will follow next. For now, let’s start simpler yet deliciously – with this dal with yummy tempering or tadka of ginger garlic onions tomato and spices cooked in ghee. You must’ve had this many times in dhabas or restaurants, now you can make the exact dish at home!

Serves 4
Cooking Time 30 mins
Ingredients
Moong dal 1 cup
Masoor dal ¼ cup
Onion 1
Tomato 1
Garlic 4 cloves
Ginger ½ inch piece
Green Chili 1
Kasoori methi /Dry fenugreek leaves 1 tsp
Fresh Coriander chopped 1 tbsp
Garam Masala ½ tsp
Red chili powder ¼ tsp
Dry Coriander powder ½ tsp
Turmeric powder ½ tsp
Hing/asafetida ½ tsp
Jeera/cumin 1 tsp
Salt to taste
Ghee ½ tbsp

How to make Dal Tadka
  • Mix the masoor and moong dal and wash in a bowl, 3-4 times.
  • Boil 4 cups water in a pressure cooker.
  • Add the washed lentils/dal. Add 1 tsp salt. Mix well.
  • Keep the flame on medium. After few mins, a foam or scum will start forming on top. Scrape it off with a ladle and throw. Repeat till no more scum is formed.  
  • Now add ½ tsp salt and turmeric powder. Reduce the flame to low. Cover the cooker a little more than half with a lid leaving some space for steam to escape. This way the grains of dal remain separate and do not get pasty. You can cook in 2 whistles as well to speed up cooking, but that mashes the lentils.
  • Let it simmer on low flame for 15 mins or till cooked. Mash a grain with the back of spoon or between fingers to check if it’s cooked well.


How to make the Tadka or the Tempering
  • Chop and crush the ginger and garlic very fine with a pestle.
  • Chop the green chili and onion.
  • Make the rough chunky puree of the tomato. Do not make a very fine paste.
  • Take the ghee in a frying pan. Once ghee is hot, add hing and jeera.
  • When jeera splits, add the paste made of ginger and garlic and stir.
  • Add the chopped green chili, and onions.
  • Stir and cook, keeping the flame on medium.
  • When the onion gets light pinkish brown, add the tomato puree and reduce flame to low.
  • Cook for 3-4 mins, then add kasuri methi, dry spices and a pinch of salt. Add ½ tsp of chopped coriander.
  • Cook for another few mins till the oil starts to separate from the mixture. This indicates the Masala is cooked.
  • Now mix this Masala in the boiled dal. Check the seasoning and add salt to taste. Taste before adding as salt is added to water when boiling the dal and also in tempering.
  • Garnish with coriander leaves and serve hot with roti or rice.

Note: The tempering for dal tastes best when made in ghee. You can use oil if watching calories.
Chef’s tip: For the easier simpler version of this recipe, when you’re in hurry, you can make the tempering with only ghee, hing, jeera and tomato puree. Tastes great as a simple quick fix, but that won’t be the real Dal Tadka!

Tapioca is basically a root starch derived from the cassava, or yuca plant. In western countries, it's often used to thicken soups and sweeten the flavor of baked goods, and it makes a dandy pudding.
The cassava plant is native to South America and the West Indies, where its thick, fibrous roots are used in a variety of forms: bread flour, laundry starch, an alcoholic brew, and of course, tapioca pudding. As the Encyclopedia Britannica tells us, it was probably first harvested by the Mayans.

Don't try making your own tapioca at home. Cassava roots have traces of cyanide in them! The ever-resourceful Mayans figured out how to extract this poison for their blow darts, leaving the uncontaminated roots free for eating.

How is Tapioca made
To make tapioca, the root is pulped and washed to leave the usable starch behind. The starch is heated so that individual granules will burst, and the resulting paste is reformed into a powder, flake, or pearl form. Tapioca powder is used for things like jellies and pudding, since it dissolves well in warm water. The flakes are also used for similar applications, while the pearls are usually used whole in foods like pearl milk tea.

The flavor of tapioca is fairly neutral, making it an excellent choice of thickener for both sweet and savory foods. Tapioca also has little nutritional value. The limited nutritional value of cassava root in general has caused historical problems, especially among peoples who rely on it for a major source of nutrition. As a supplement to other foods, however, cassava is quite useful. In addition to being grown in South America, the root is also cultivated in Africa and Asia for an assortment of uses.

Classic tapioca pudding is made with whole pearls of tapioca, which lend a texture to an otherwise smooth or bland pudding. The pearls become chewy and resilient when cooked, and this property is also harnessed to make boba or pearl milk tea, a popular Asian beverage. Pearl milk tea is made with large pearls of tapioca, mixed with fruit juice or tea, a sweetener, and milk. A specialized straw allows the drinker to suck up the large pearls along with the beverage.

In India, its also known as javvari in a few places. These small pearl, white balls are extracted from the pith of the sago palm. When cooked they turn from their opaque white color to translucent, and become soft and spongy. It is most commonly used in fasting dishes such as sabudana khichdi, when devout Hindus neglect from eating meats and poultry. In South India they are used to make small pappadam wafers called sabudhana poha.

Nutritional Value
Tapioca is low on nutritional value, but it can add some vital minerals to your meal.
Vitamins
Tapioca is short on vitamin content, however, according to NutritionData, a website that imparts nutritional information from the USDA, it does contains some B vitamins. Folate (vitamin B9) is the highest concentrated B vitamin, with 1 cup of tapioca, containing 6.1 mcg, or 2 percent of the daily value (DV). Folate is an important vitamin, but according to the National Institutes of Health's Office of Dietary Supplements, it is especially vital for pregnant women or those who may become pregnant, as it is important in the formation of new cells and in preventing birth defects. That is not 1 cup of tapioca "pudding," but 1 cup of pure tapioca, so the pudding, or another tapioca dish, will have less than that. Along with folate, 1 cup of tapioca contains a trace of pantothenic acid, choline and vitamin B6.

Minerals
Tapioca makes up for its lack of vitamin content by providing several minerals, the most prevalent of which is iron. One cup of tapioca contains 2.4 mg of iron, which is 13 percent of the DV. Calcium is available at 30.4 mg, which is 3 percent of the DV. Other important minerals, in lesser amounts, in tapioca are magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

Video of how Sago/Sabudana/Tapioca is made:



Essential Fatty Acids
While the amount may be small, tapioca is a source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. According to the Linus Pauling Institute, fatty acids cannot be synthesized within the human body, which is why they must be consumed from dietary sources. One cup of tapioca contains 1.5 mg of omega-3 acids, and 3 mg of omega-6 fatty acids. Tapioca does not contain any other fat. 
If you are watching your calorie intake, you may want to avoid tapioca products. One cup contains a whopping 544 calories, and 135 g of carbohydrates.
Find many Sabudana/Tapioca based fasting dishes here.
http://www.tasteandflavours.com/search/label/Fasting
 


P.S. The video is shared from a Youtube channel. Thanks Youtube for making it fun!
 Jeera Aloo – Maggi of fasting

Soft boiled potatoes with tempering of spices and Cumin
Jeera aloo is so easy to make that this recipe may well be just of 5 lines. It needs just 3 basic ingredients and your delicious potatoes in minutes are ready. This dish is basically the Maggi of Fasting – ready in 2 mins and super tasty and can be had in so many ways – you can have it as a appetizer if cut into cubes, and can be had with Kuttu ki roti and curd as a proper lunch meal or just as a side dish on the usual non fasting days as well. You can ½ cup tomato puree and 1 cup water to this recipe and make the gravy potatoes which are simply awesome with pooris.
Find the complete recipe for aloo poori click here. You can make them the day you end your fasts along with the Prasad as sooji ka halwa. What a feast!

Serves 4
Cooking time 20 mins
Ingredients
3 medium Potatoes
Green chili 1 (more if you like spicy)
Jeera / cumin 1 tsp
Garam masala ½ tsp
Dry coriander powder ½ tsp
Red chili powder ¼ tsp
Amchoor powder ¼ tsp
Saenda namak (salt for fast) To Taste
Oil 1 tbsp
Fresh coriander leaves for garnishing

How to make Jeera Aloo

  • Boil the potatoes. Peel and roughly mash or cut into small pieces.
  • In a cup, mix all the dry spices.
  • Heat the oil in a pan.
  • Add jeera and chopped green chilies and stir well for 2 mins.
  • When jeera splits, add the mixed dry spices. Stir for 1 min.
  • Add potatoes. Mix well using a flat spatula. Do not use a ladle for stirring as it mashes the potatoes too much.
  • Now add the salt to taste. Cook for 5-8 mins. Do not leave it standing or cover with lid.
  • Take off the stove. Garnish with coriander and serve hot with roti. Instead of mashing, you can chop the potatoes into cubes and serve with toothpicks or fork for having it as a snack.

http://www.tasteandflavours.com/2012/08/suji-ka-halwa-semolina-pudding.html
Chef’s Tip: Boiling the potatoes reduces the cooking time. But if you like it crispy, then instead of boiling, you simply dice the potatoes and put in the pan after the spices. Stir and cook for 5-6 mins on medium flame. Then add just a few drops of water, cover with a lid and cook for another 5-8 mins so the potatoes cook through. Mix well and serve hot.

Sabudana Vada
This is one of the most favorite breakfast in whole of maharasthra and can be found in all of those little local streetside joints. It’s basically a fried tapioca cutlet or the sabudana wada/vada. It’s made exactly like the daal wada, just the main ingredient is sabudana here. The recipe is very similar to the sabudana khichdi, the only difference being, instead of stir frying, this one is deep fried. You can have this for breakfast or as an evening snack esp during the fasting days.

Serves 4
Cooking time 20 mins

Ingredients
Potatoes 2
Sabudana 1 cup
Peanuts ½ cup
Green chili 1 (more if you like spicy)
Jeera / cumin 1 tsp
Garam masala ½ tsp
Dry coriander powder ½ tsp
Red chili powder ¼ tsp
Saenda namak (salt for fast) To Taste
Oil for deep frying

How to make sabudana Vada / Tapioca Cutlets
  • Soak the sabudana overnight in ¾ cup water.
  • Boil the potatoes. Peel and mash with hands.
  • Crush the peanuts with a pestle or in a blender.
  • In a bowl, mix together the sabudana, potatoes, chopped green chilies, crushed peanuts, all the spices, jeera and salt.
  • Mix well, but take not to mash the sabudana.
  • Make small cutlets or tikkis with this mixture and keep in a plate. Rub a few drops of oil on your palms so the mixture doesn’t stick.
  • Heat the oil in a pan for deep frying.
  • Fry the cutlets till they get crisp and golden brown.
  • Take out on a paper napkin to soak excess oil.
  • Serve hot with coriander chutney, cold curd or raita.

Chef’s Raita Tip
Take a cup of hung curd. Add salt, red chili powder, and ground roasted cumin powder. Mix well and serve as a tasty relish with the vadas.

Sabudana Khichdi
This is the favorite breakfast of everyone at home during the navratri fasting. It’s basically a maharashtrian snack, but as we can consume sabudana (Sago or Tapioca) during these fasts, this khichdi makes for a good option for a meal or just the breakfast. Sabudana is very versatile ingredient and you can make a variety of dishes using sabudana and potato combination, such as this khichdi, wadas, cutlet, and kheer as a dessert as well.

Main Fasting food ingredients - Potatoes,Sabudana,Green chilies,Peanuts

Serves 4
Cooking time 20 mins
Ingredients
Potatoes 2
Sabudana 1 cup
Peanuts ½ cup
Green chili 1 (more if you like spicy)
Jeera / cumin 1 tsp
Garam masala ½ tsp
Dry coriander powder ½ tsp
Red chili powder ¼ tsp
Saenda namak (salt for fast) To Taste
Oil 1 tbsp

How to make sabudana khichdi
  • Soak the sabudana overnight in ¾ cup water.
  • Boil the potatoes. Peel and mash or cut into small pieces.
  • Crush the peanuts with a pestle or in a blender.
  • Heat the oil in a pan.
  • Add jeera, chopped green chilies, and crushed peanuts and stir well for 2 mins.
  • Add potatoes and all the dry spices. Mix well.
  • Now add the soaked and softened sabudana and mix well, using a flat spatula. Do not use a ladle for stirring as it flattens the sabudana and mashes it.
  • Now add the salt to taste. Keep the flame on medium and keep stirring otherwise the sabudana sticks and can form lumps.
  • Cook for 5 mins. Do not leave it standing or cover with lid.
  • Serve hot with coriander chutney, cold curd or raita.


What can you eat in Navratras Fast
It’s a myth I feel that during fast we starve ourselves! In fact the opposite is true for the Navratras fasting period of 7-8 days. There are some who eat only fruits and some who eat proper meal once a day during the fast. If you’re keeping it for 1-2 days, usually for the first and last day fast, you can easily have a few options to choose from. But the ones who keep it for the whole week many a time get too bored with monotony of eating fruit every day. There are several options of food to choose from what you can eat during the navratri fasts. Care must be taken to use only Swaang ke chawal (special small rice variety for this fast), Saenda namak (uniodized salt for fast) and Kuttu or Singhade ka atta (flour for the fast as wheat or rice cannot be consumed).

Foods you can consume without worry during the Navratras fast ( or any fast where you cannot consume regular grains and vegetables) :
·        Dishes make with Swaang ke Chawal
·        Food made with Sabudana or Tapioca
·        Dishes made with Kuttu or Singhade ka atta
·        Dishes made with potato (without using any other vegetable)
·        Fruit salads with only lime juice or saenda namak (Do not add the regular chaat Masala)

Now the list of foods and dishes you can make and eat during fast.

·        Jeera aloo (dry, not in gravy)
·        Potato chips
·        Aloo ka Halwa (sweet mashed potato with milk and sugar)

·        Mashed potato savory, with only salt and cumin powder
·        Sabudana Chips

·        Sabudana Khichdi
·        Sabudana Wada
·        Sabudana Kheer
·        Swaan ke chawal ki kheer
·        Kuttu ki tikki ( fried Kuttu cutlets)
·        Aloo tikki (potato cutlets)
·        Kuttu ki roti
·        Usual meal during fast – Kuttu ki roti, alu jeera sabji and curd

The common foods you can consume:
·        Tea
·        Coffee
·        Curd, plain or flavored
·        Milk
·        Soft drinks
·        Fresh fruit juices (packaged ones have salt and other flavorings)
·        Homemade ice-creams / fruit shakes
·        Nuts and raisins
·     For the ones with sweet tooth, you can make frozen fruit yogurts as well!

So enjoy this Navratri with so many great options to choose from. The fasts are kept for the peace of mind not merely for the sake of the rituals. So be happy this Navratri season and make it more Festive than Fastive!

Next PostNewer Posts Previous PostOlder Posts Home